Eugenia Bazylevych

Eugenia Bazylevych

Eugenia Bazylevych

Apr 20, 2023

Apr 20, 2023

What People Often Ask About Meeting Minutes?

Meeting minutes are an essential aspect of organizational communication and record-keeping. They provide a detailed, written account of discussions, decisions, and action items from meetings, ensuring that all attendees have a clear understanding of the topics covered and any resulting tasks. In this article, we'll address some of the most common questions people have about meeting minutes, such as what they are, why they're called "minutes," their purpose, and what makes for effective meeting minutes.

What are meeting minutes?

What are meeting minutes?

Meeting minutes are written records that capture the key details and decisions made during a meeting. These minutes serve as a reference for attendees, helping them remember important points, discussions, and assigned tasks. For individuals who were unable to attend the meeting, minutes provide a summary of what was discussed and any decisions made. In addition, they can be used to track progress on tasks and provide a historical record of meetings for future reference.

Why is it called minutes?


Why is it called minutes?

The term "minutes" in the context of meetings comes from the Latin word "minuta," which means "small" or "minute." The term was originally used to describe a brief summary of important points and decisions made during a meeting. Over time, the usage of "minutes" expanded to encompass more detailed records of meetings, but the name has remained.

What is the purpose of meeting minutes?


What is the purpose of meeting minutes?

The main purpose of meeting minutes is to provide a written record of the key information discussed during a meeting, including decisions made and action items assigned. They serve several important functions, such as:

  • Ensuring that attendees have a clear understanding of what was discussed and the decisions made.

  • Providing a reference for individuals who were unable to attend the meeting.

  • Allowing for tracking of progress on tasks and responsibilities.

  • Offering a historical record of meetings for future reference or analysis.

What should be included in meeting minutes?


What should be included in meeting minutes?

Meeting minutes should include the following information:

  • Date, time of the meeting.

  • Names of attendees and any absentees.

  • Approval or amendments to previous meeting minutes.

  • Agenda items discussed, along with a summary of the discussion.

  • Decisions made, including any votes or consensus reached.

  • Action items assigned, including the responsible party and deadline.

  • Any additional information, such as announcements or updates.

  • Date, time, and location of the next meeting.

  • Signature of the individual responsible for taking the minutes.


What are the 4 types of minutes?

There are four main types of minutes, each serving a different purpose and level of detail:

1. Action minutes: These minutes focus on decisions made and action items assigned during a meeting. They are often brief and to the point, without including a detailed summary of discussions.

2. Discussion minutes: These minutes provide a more comprehensive record of the discussions that took place during a meeting. They may include summaries of arguments, points of view, and any relevant data or information.

3. Verbatim minutes: These minutes provide a word-for-word transcript of the meeting, capturing everything that was said by participants. Verbatim minutes are rarely used in most organizational settings, as they can be time-consuming and difficult to review.

4. Hybrid minutes: These minutes combine elements of action and discussion minutes, providing a balance between capturing decisions and action items while also summarizing key discussions and points raised.

What is the structure of minutes?


What is the structure of minutes?

The structure of meeting minutes typically includes the following sections:

  • Heading: The heading includes the name of the organization, the type of meeting, and the date, time, and location.

  • Attendees and absentees: This section lists the names of attendees and any absentees, along with their titles or roles within the organization.

  • Approval of previous minutes: A statement regarding the approval or amendment of minutes from the previous meeting should be included.

  • Agenda items and discussions: This section should be organized by agenda items, with a summary of the discussions and any relevant information for each item. Be sure to capture the key points, decisions, and any votes or consensus reached.

  • Action items: Action items should be clearly identified, along with the responsible parties and deadlines for completion.

  • Announcements and updates: Include any announcements, updates, or other pertinent information that was shared during the meeting.

  • Next meeting: Provide details on the date, time, and location of the next meeting.

  • Signature: The individual responsible for taking the minutes should sign the document, verifying its accuracy.

What makes good meeting minutes?


What makes good meeting minutes?

Good meeting minutes should be clear, concise, and accurate. They should provide enough detail for attendees to understand the discussions and decisions made, without being overly lengthy or complicated. To ensure effective meeting minutes, consider the following:

  • Be organized: Follow a consistent structure and format for your minutes, making it easy for readers to locate information.

  • Be objective: Write the minutes in a neutral tone, focusing on the facts and avoiding personal opinions or biases.

  • Be selective: Focus on the most important points and decisions, without including unnecessary or irrelevant details.

  • Be accurate: Double-check your notes for accuracy and completeness, ensuring that all decisions, action items, and other critical information are captured.

  • Be timely: Distribute the meeting minutes as soon as possible after the meeting, while the information is still fresh in attendees' minds.

What is the difference between minutes and reports?

Minutes and reports are both written documents that capture information about meetings, but they serve different purposes and have different formats.

Meeting minutes provide a detailed record of the discussions, decisions, and action items from a meeting. They are typically organized by agenda items, with summaries of discussions and any relevant details. Minutes are meant to be a clear, concise, and accurate record of the meeting for attendees and others who may need to reference the information.

Reports, on the other hand, are often more formal documents that present information or findings on a specific topic or issue. They may be the result of a presentation, discussion, or research conducted during a meeting. Reports are typically structured with an introduction, body, and conclusion, and they may include data, graphics, or other supporting materials.

What are the basic elements of meeting minutes?


What are the basic elements of meeting minutes?

The fundamental components of meeting minutes include the following:

1. Heading: This includes the name of the organization or committee, the type of meeting, and the date, time, and location of the meeting.

2. List of attendees and absentees: This section provides the names, titles, or roles of those who attended the meeting, as well as the names of those who were absent.

3. Approval or amendment of previous minutes: A statement that highlights whether the minutes of the previous meeting were approved or if any amendments were made.

4. Agenda topics and summaries: This portion of the minutes is organized by agenda items, with each item accompanied by a brief summary of the discussions, decisions made, and any other relevant details.

5. Action items and responsibilities: Clearly identify the action items that emerged from the meeting, along with the individuals or teams responsible for completing them and the respective deadlines.

6. Announcements and updates: Include any noteworthy announcements, news, or updates shared during the meeting that may be relevant to attendees or the organization as a whole.

7. Information about the next meeting: Provide the date, time, and location for the next scheduled meeting, if applicable.

8. Signature or approval: The person responsible for recording the minutes should sign or approve the document, verifying that the information is accurate and complete.


Who should read minutes of the meeting?

Meeting minutes should be read and reviewed by the following individuals:

  • Attendees: Those who participated in the meeting should review the minutes to ensure that they accurately reflect the discussions, decisions, and action items.

  • Absentees: Individuals who were unable to attend the meeting can use the minutes to stay informed about the topics discussed and decisions made.

  • Management and leadership: Managers, supervisors, and other organizational leaders may need to review the minutes to stay informed about the progress and outcomes of meetings within their areas of responsibility.

  • Committee or team members: Members of specific committees or teams may need to review minutes from meetings that pertain to their work or projects.

  • Future reference: Meeting minutes can also be useful for individuals who need to reference the information or decisions from a particular meeting in the future.

Conclusion

Meeting minutes play a crucial role in effective organizational communication and record-keeping. By understanding the different types of minutes, their purpose, and what should be included, you can create clear, concise, and accurate meeting minutes that serve as a valuable reference for attendees and other stakeholders. Keep these tips in mind when crafting your meeting minutes, and remember to review and distribute them in a timely manner for the best results. To further streamline the process and ensure accuracy, consider using a tool like Noty.ai, a ChatGPT-powered meeting assistant that transforms meetings into transcriptions, action items, summaries, and follow-ups in seconds. This powerful tool can help you efficiently capture important information from your meetings and make the process of creating and distributing minutes even easier.